Big Hero 6

If you saw the Disney movie Big Hero 6 then you know its only a matter of time before robots may be guiding our children through anxious medical and dental treatments.  We already utilize technology in the dental office in the form of cartoons and movies as distraction.  A new robot has been designed specifically to help children manage pain and painful medical treatments.

robot

Dr. Tanya Beran, Chief Scientific Officer for RxRobots™ and Professor in Community Health
Sciences at the Cumming School of Medicine,
University of Calgary observed an experiment of a teenage boy interacting with a robot. Not only did he show empathy, but he also tried to help the robot.
Not knowing why and with little in the research to explain this behavior, she started her own. Dr. Beran was shocked to find that children tend to think that robots are alive.
While working in hospitals, Dr. Beran was alarmed to see children screaming, struggling, and pleading not to have a needle. She realized these procedures need to be easier, faster, and far less painful.

“MEDi will become an essential part of the dental team of every dental office”

Results from a randomized trial, published in the June 2013 issue of the Vaccine journal, showed that MEDi helped calm children and reduce their pain by 50 percent during medical procedures, such as vaccinations, using cognitive-behavioral intervention. Comparable results are now being gathered by a dental office in New Jersey.

The dental team has been utilizing MEDi for about five months now and reports overall positive experiences. MEDi is constantly in the active mode allowing children to interact with him immediately and continually upon entering the dental operatory. MEDi distracts the children, reducing their initial anxiety and fear. They listen to the MEDi’s instructions, which allows the rest of the dental team to move forward faster and more seamlessly with their work with a more compliant patient.

 

 

 

 

 

Sealants!

Dental Sealants

Did you know?

Sealant1

One of the best ways to protect a child’s teeth from tooth decay is with dental sealants

Dental sealants protect the teeth through the cavity-prone years, ages six to 14, when back teeth are first susceptible to decay. Sealants provide extra protection on childrens teeth until they learn how to do a better job of brushing and flossing.

Sealants act as barriers, protecting the teeth against decay-causing bacteria. The sealants are usually applied to the chewing surfaces of the back teeth (premolars and molars) where decay occurs most often.

Applying dental sealants is a simple, painless procedure that’s also inexpensive compared to filling a cavity.

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Just the facts

  • Dental Sealants are a clear plastic material, professionally applied to the back teeth to prevent cavities.
  • 90% of children’s tooth decay occurs on tooth surfaces with pits and fissures. Sealants do a great job of preventing tooth decay on those kinds of surfaces.
  • Your child can benefit from sealants applied around six years of age, when first permanent molars erupt.

Questions and Answers

What are sealants?

Sealants are made of a white or clear resin material. They help shield bacteria which causes decay on the surface of the back teeth.

How can sealants prevent decay?

The sealant material bonds to the chewing surface of the back teeth, forming a protective barrier covering the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) of the molars.

Sealants prevent bacteria from nestling into the grooves of the teeth AND they seal out any food sources from the deep pits and fissures of molar teeth.

Why are sealants necessary?

Because the depressions and grooves (pits and fissures) on the back teeth are impossible to keep clean. The tooth brush bristles cannot reach deep into them. These depressions and grooves are snug places for food and plaque to hide. By coating the grooves with a thick covering of sealant material, plaque and food is kept out, decereasing the chances of decay.

Which teeth are suitable for sealants?

First and second molars are most likely to benefit from sealant applications. It is best to seal these molars right after they have just erupted catching them before decay sets in. First molars generally appear at around six years of age and second molars at about 12 years of age. Children between the ages of six and 14 benefit most from sealants.

How are sealants applied?

After an examination, it is determined which teeth can be sealed. Applying sealants is very simple and painless. First, the teeth are cleaned. Then in preparation for the sealant material, the teeth are dabbed with a very mild solution similar in strength to vinegar or lemon juice. This will roughen the tooth surface slightly so the sealant will bond properly to the tooth and ensure a clean tooth surface. After the tooth has been prepared, the resin sealant material is painted onto the tooth. It will flow into the grooves of the tooth and hardens in about 30 seconds. Afterwards, the bacteria cannot reach the pits and grooves.

Have sealants been thoroughly tested?

Yes. Children around the world have had their teeth sealed in clinical studies. These studies have proven sealants to be effective, easy to apply, inexpensive and nontoxic.

Are sealants covered by dental insurance?

Yes!  Most dental insurance plans offer coverage for up to 100% of the cost of placing a dental sealant.  For information specific to your dental insurance plan, please speak with a member of my staff or your dental insurance company.

How long will dental sealants last?

Sealants will chip or break off if you regularly chew on ice or hand candies (you can also break a tooth doing that!) Sealant application can last for as long as you are careful not to bite into things that are not foods.   They should be checked regularly and reapplied when the appear to have worn off.  My goal is to send your child off to college cavity free and with intact sealants to protect their teeth into the future!

Fluoride

ADA American Dental Association

Surgeon General Officially Endorses Community Water Fluoridation

U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Regina Benjamin today officially endorsed community water fluoridation as “one of the most effective choices communities can make to prevent health problems while actually improving the oral health of their citizens.”

Dr. Benjamin made her endorsement in a letter sent to the National Oral Health Conference being held this week in Huntsville, Ala. Attendees heard the letter read aloud at the conference opening ceremony this morning.

“Fluoridation’s effectiveness in preventing tooth decay is not limited to children, but extends throughout life, resulting in fewer and less severe cavities,” Dr. Benjamin wrote. “In fact, each generation born since the implementation of water fluoridation has enjoyed better dental health than the generation that preceded it.”

Every surgeon general for the past 50 years has endorsed fluoridation of community water supplies as a safe and effective weapon in the war against tooth decay.

The American Dental Association has supported fluoridation since 1950.

“The ADA’s policies regarding community water fluoridation are based on the best available science showing that fluoridation is a safe, effective way to prevent dental decay,” said ADA President Dr. Robert A. Faiella. “The ADA, along with state and local dental societies, continues to work with federal, state and local agencies to increase the number of communities benefiting from this very effective public health measure.

“We applaud Dr. Benjamin for making this public endorsement of fluoridation,” Dr. Faiella said.

Dr. Benjamin’s letter to the National Oral Health Conference is available online at ADA.org